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Computer Science

KEY STAGE 3 CURRICULUM

Students follow an enriching, balanced curriculum at Key Stage 3, which is rooted in the National Curriculum for Computing. We aim to give students a broad education that encourages creativity and equips them with the knowledge and skills to thrive in an increasingly digital world.

 

The core of Computing is computer science, in which pupils are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work and how to put his knowledge to use through programming. Building on this knowledge and understanding pupils are equipped to use information technology to create programmes, systems and a range of content. Computing also ensures that pupils become digitally literate – able to use and express themselves and develop their ideas through information and communication technology.  Computational thinking is core to the program, it allows student to tackle problems, to break them down into solvable chunks and devise algorithms to solve them.

Year 7

Term 1 Students will be introduced to the school network and online learning packages. They will learn about what computer systems are made of, software and its uses and how computers store data. Students will the difference between the WWW and the Internet. They will learn about digital safety and how to be a good digital citizen. They will investigate how to combat hacker, phishers, oversharers and bullies. During this term students will also developing and improving practical skills to become functional users of the application software Word. Assessment will take place at the end of each half term.
Term 2  Students will investigate how the Internet works and what it is used for.  During this term students will also developing and improving practical skills to become functional users of the application software Excel. Students will start to learn about key computing concepts e.g decomposition and then start to solve problems learning how to represent program code using flow charts and pseudocode. Assessment will take place at the end of each half term. A useful website for this term is http://www.bebras.uk/
Term 3  This term is dedicated to learning about programming constructs and how are they used in constructing code. A block based environment SCRATCH will be used to develop practical skills, knowledge and understanding of sequencing, repetition, variables selection and Boolean operators. Students will be asked to problem solve finding and fixing errors in ode and produce their own program code. Assessment will be at the end of each term. Useful websites for this term  https://scratch.mit.edu/ and https://codeclub.org/en/

Year 8 

Term 1

Students will be investigating ethical, moral, environmental and legal issues surrounding the use of IT. They will undertake a project, planning, developing and producing a digital artefact. They will be making decisions on how to present their work in the most effective way. Assessment will be at the end of each term.

Term 2  There will be a showcase of student work from term 1. Winners for each topic will present their final pieces of work to their peers. During this term students will start to investigate how data is represented, they will look at binary, denary and ASCII number systems and how they are used by computers to represent images and sound. Students will then revisit how to represent program code using flow charts and pseudocode.
Term 3   This term is dedicated to learning about a new programming textual programming language; Python, students will use prior knowledge of programming constructs to develop practical skills, knowledge and understanding of how to use the software effectively to solve and fix errors in code and produce their own program code. Assessment will be at the end of each term. Useful websites for this term   https://codeclub.org/en/

KEY STAGE 4 CURRICULUM

OCR GCSE COMPUTING OPTION SUBJECT

COURSE CONTACT: MRS O JONES– LEARNING MANAGER

Exam Board Website: http://ocr.org.uk/qualifications/gcse/gcse-computer-science-j276-from-2016/

Course Content 

Component 01: Computer systems

Introduces students to the central processing unit (CPU), computer memory and storage, wired and wireless networks, network topologies, system security and system software. It also looks at ethical, legal, cultural and environmental concerns associated with computer science.

Component 02: Computational Thinking, Algorithms and Programming

Students apply knowledge and understanding gained in component 01. They develop skills and understanding in computational thinking: algorithms, programming techniques, producing robust programs, computational logic, translators and data representation.

Programming Project

Students use OCR Programming Project tasks to develop their practical ability in the skills developed in components 01 and 02. They will have the opportunity to define success criteria from a given problem, and then create suitable algorithms to achieve the success criteria. Students then code their solutions in a suitable programming language and check its functionality using a suitable and documented test plan. Finally, they will evaluate the success of their solution and reflect on potential developments for the future.

Students will be offered 20 hours timetabled time to complete their Programming Project. The Programming Project does not count towards the final grade but is a requirement of the course

Assessment Details

The assessment for Computing will take place in 2 examinations and 1 controlled assessment at the end of Year 11.

  • Written exam Computer systems (01) 80 marks paper for 1 hour and 30 minutes. Worth 50% of the overall grade.
  • Written paper Computational thinking, algorithms and programming (02) 80 marks 1 hour and 30 minutes. Worth 50% of the overall grade.
  • Controlled Assessment Programming project (03/04) Totaling 20 hours. 

Why Study This Course? 

The course provides excellent preparation for higher study and employment in the field of Computer Science. The increasing importance of information technologies means there will be a growing demand for professionals who are qualified in this area. Students who have taken a GCSE in Computing and who then progress to study the subject at A-Level or university will have an advantage over their peers who are picking up the subject at these levels.